COVID-19 FAQ & Resources - Yellowhawk Tribal Health Center
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COVID-19 FAQ & Resources

COVID-19 FAQ:

Have you had COVID-19 already?

YES

    • Do not assume you have immunity to all variants of COVID-19, you may have immunity to the variant contracted but you can still get COVID again, which is why being vaccinated is critical.
    • You can get COVID again in the future, possibly a few months after having it for the first time.

NO

    • Get vaccinated.
    • Vaccination, washing hands, wearing a proper mask and social distancing are still critical.
    • Even if you are vaccinated, you can still contract COVID-19, but you are less likely to have severe illness and need to be hospitalized.

What is a COVID-19 Case? What happens if I am a case?

A case is someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 with a viral test.

 

Individuals who test positive should go into isolation. Isolation is when someone is required to stay at home and away from other people. This isolation period may last up to 10 days. Seek out educational resources here.

What is a COVID-19 contact? How will I know if I'm a contact?

A close contact is a person with an epidemiologic exposure to a person with confirmed or presumptive COVID 19. In short , being within 6 feet of a COVID 19 case for ≥15 minutes. Contacts do not need to quarantine. Contacts should monitor for symptoms and test 5 days after exposure.  If symptoms develop then they should test and isolate.

What is the difference between isolation and quarantine?

QUARANTINE keeps someone who was in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 away from others.

ISOLATION keeps someone who is sick or tested positive for COVID-19 without symptoms away from others, even in their own home.

How do I manage stress during COVID-19?

The spread of a virus like COVID-19 can be stressful. It is normal to feel fear and anxiety about COVID-19 as positive cases appear in local communities, and as routines are disrupted by social distancing and home isolation.

Stress during this time can have a big impact on home lives. It is normal to feel like things are out of control, but there are ways to bring down stress levels. To reduce stress, it is important to learn how to recognize the signs of stress and to learn strategies for managing stress. For some people – like those who experience violence at home – more help may be needed to support a safe home environment.

 

Recognizing the signs of stress

A person’s body can react to stress in strong ways. People have different signs of stress, but they may include:

 

  • An increase or decrease in energy and activity levels
  • An increase in frustration, with outbursts of anger and frequent arguing
  • Having trouble relaxing or sleeping
  • Not wanting to eat or eating too much
  • Worrying much more than usual
  • Wanting to be alone most of the time
  • Not able to feel pleasure or have fun
  • Feeling depressed, anxious, or fearful
  • An increase in alcohol use or use of illegal drugs

 

Strategies to manage stress

Stress can be managed, even when it feels like it’s impossible to deal with. Here are some strategies to reduce stress at home:

 

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Instead, read a book or watch a show that takes the mind off the news.
  • Care for the body! Take deep breaths with eyes closed, stretch, or meditate. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, get plenty of sleep, and avoid alcohol and drugs.
  • Exercise! Get outside for a walk, or do an in-home workout.
  • Connect with others through a phone call or video chat! Share concerns and feelings with a friend or family member.
  • Try to laugh! Humor is a great way to calm the mind.

 

Support for those at risk of violence in the home

People who experience violence or abuse at home may be experiencing increased stress and danger during this period of social distancing and home isolation.

If someone is experiencing violence or abuse in their home, they are not alone. There are many resources available to help:

 

  • The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free: 1.800.799.7233 and through chat.
  • The National Sexual Assault Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free: 800.656.HOPE 4673 and through chat.
  • The StrongHearts Native Helpline for domestic/sexual violence is available 7am-10pm CT, confidential, and specifically for Native communities: 1.844.762.8483.
  • The SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline offers 24/7, confidential and free crisis counseling: 1.800.985.5990.
  • They can also reach out to a friend, co-worker, or family member who can check in with them about their safety and support needs, and help them make plans for staying somewhere else if their situation becomes dangerous.

 

We all can support those at risk by reaching out to loved ones, friends, neighbors, and coworkers to see if they have the care and support they need, and if they feel safe at home. If you suspect someone you know may be experiencing violence or abuse at home, consider reaching out to let them know you are available to talk. You can also call the free, confidential National Domestic Violence Hotline 24/7 at 1.800.799.7233.

Mental Health Resources

Help is just a phone call away:

+ Yellowhawk Behavioral Health: 541.240.8670

+ For instructions on accessing Telehealth click here.

+ Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call or text 988

+ Lifeways: 1.866.343.4473

+ Problem Gambling: 1.877.MYLIMIT

+ SAMHSA Disaster Distress Line:1.800.985.5990

+ Oregon Alcohol & Drug Helpline: 1.800.923.4357

+ Crisis Text Line: 988

+ Community Counseling Solutions Crisis (24/7): 1.541.240.8030

Other options:

  • Crisis Text Line Text NATIVE to 741741
  • Teen Text Line Text TEEN to 839863
  • Youthline 1.877.968.8491
  • Veterans Crisis Line 1.800.273.8255 (Press 1)

Chemical Dependency Resources

Online Resources:

 

+ Smart Recovery: smartrecovery.org

+ Addiction Recovery Guide: addictionrecoveryguide.org

+ NA Recovery: na-recovery.org

+ AA Chats: aachats.org

+ Healthful Chat: healthfulchat.org/drugs-and-alcohol-chat-room.html

+ Sober Courage: sobercourage.com/support-online

+ Addiction Recovery Guide: addictionrecoveryguide.org

+ For information about the Connections App for individuals in recovery click here.

 

Help locating AA/AN meetings:

 

+ Locations of local meetings in our area: www.district3aa.org

+ Resources to talk with and access for information: www.na.org

+ Talk to a professional: www.sober.com

+ Keep up on things happening in recovery: https://www.oregonrecovers.org/

What if I am sick?

If you have fever, cough or difficulty breathing and have not been around anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19, you should stay home!

  • If symptoms worsen, call your healthcare provider.
  • In an emergency, call 911.
  • Stay home and away from others to avoid getting others sick. Some people may have mild illness and feel well enough to go out. DO NOT do this because it will spread disease.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Use a separate bathroom if possible.
  • Do not shake hands, hug, or touch others.
  • Avoid sharing items such as bedding, clothing, towels, and dishes with other people in your household.
  • Every day, disinfect all “high touch” surfaces multiple times a day. These surfaces include: counters, tabletops, faucet handles, phones, and doorknobs. Common household cleaners and disinfectants are recommended. Wear gloves if possible.

What do I do if I need to go to the doctor?

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., you start having difficulty breathing). Before going in, call your healthcare provider and tell them that your symptoms are consistent with COVID-19. Put on a facemask, if possible, before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting your infection. If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, tell the dispatch personnel that you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

What should I use to clean my home?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has guidelines for cleaning your home to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. You can find specific instructions online, click here.

Why or how should I wear a face covering?

Wearing a cloth face covering CORRECTLY can help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others. When you go out on essential trips, follow these “do’s”.

 

Remember those under age 2 or individuals who cannot take the mask off on their own should not wear a face covering.

 

Wearing a Face Covering:

 

Putting a face covering on

  • Wash your hands
  • Place face covering of your nose and mouth
  • Make sure you can breath easily

 

Taking a face covering off

  • Take off your face covering without touching the front or inside of the mask
  • Fold outside corners together
  • Put aside for washing
  • Wash your hands

 

For more information on face coverings, including sew and no sew patterns, check out the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/…/prevent…/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html

What if I have diabetes?

Diabetes & COVID-19

  • Risk of diabetic related complications of COVID-19 infections is lowered when your blood sugar is kept under control
  • In case you would get sick, have a list of all medications you take, the dosages, and how often you take them (you can ask the Yellowhawk Pharmacy staff to print a copy of this for you)

 

If you take Metformin, insulin, or any other medication, continue to take it as prescribed

  • Make sure to refill your medication and diabetic sensors on time – schedule your refill through the Yellowhawk Pharmacy by calling 541.240.8690
  • Call the Yellowhawk Pharmacy at 541.240.8691 to arrange for parking lot pick up or home delivery of medication, or if you need help replacing a diabetic sensor

 

Follow dietary recommendations your healthcare provider has given you, even when planning emergency food supplies

  • Choose foods low in added sugar
  • Choose whole grain carbohydrates if possible
  • If using canned fruit, drain and rinse the fruit to remove syrup and juice or use frozen fruit for lower sugar content
  • Try to plan meals around fresh, frozen, or canned vegetables, and use smaller portions of pasta, rice, and potatoes
  • If you are prone to low blood sugar, keep things like jam, honey, regular soda, or hard candies on hand

 

For more information visit: https://www.diabetes.org/coronavirus-covid-19

What if I have lung disease?

Lung Disease & COVID-19

  • The risk of asthma, COPE, or other lung disease related complications of a COVID-19 infection is lowered when your condition is well controlled
  • In case you would get sick, have a list of all medications you take, the dosages, and how often you take them (you can ask the Yellowhawk Pharmacy staff to print a copy of this for you)

 

If you use an inhaler, use a nebulizer, or take any other medication, continue to do so as prescribed

  • Make sure to refill your medications on time – schedule your refill through the Yellowhawk Pharmacy by calling 541.240.8690
  • Call the Yellowhawk Pharmacy at 541.240.8691 to arrange for parking lot pick up or home delivery of medications
  • If you have a rescue inhaler or other medication you do not use often, check its expiration date

 

Keep a log of what’s normal for you so you have a baseline to compare symptoms to if you begin to feel sick

  • On a normal day when you are not sick, how often would you experience coughing or shortness of breath?
  • What usually triggers your asthma or COPD symptoms to worsen? (i.e. smoke, cold temperatures, exercise)
  • If you have a peak flow meter at home, what is your normal range when you use it?

 

For more information visit: https://www.lung.org/blog/update-covid-19

What if I have kidney disease?

Kidney Disease & COVID-19

  • The risk of kidney disease related complications of a COVID-19 infection is lowered when your condition is well controlled
  • Patients on dialysis should continue going to their regularly scheduled appointments
  • If you have concerns about your dialysis appointment contact the facility directly for more information about the steps they are taking to keep patients safe

 

CONTINUE TO TAKE ALL YOUR MEDICATIONS AS PRESCRIBED

  • Make sure to refill your medications on time – schedule your refill through the Yellowhawk Pharmacy by calling 541.240.8690
  • Call the Yellowhawk Pharmacy at 541.240.8691 to arrange for parking lot pick up or home delivery of medications
  • Have a list of all medications you take, the dosages, and how often you take them (you can ask the Yellowhawk Pharmacy staff to print a copy of this for you)

 

Follow dietary recommendations your healthcare provider has given you, even when planning emergency food supplies

  • If you want help thinking of meal ideas or planning what foods to have on hand, check out the link below for suggestions from the National Kidney Foundation
  • They have both low sodium and low sodium, low potassium, and low phosphorus food lists

 

For more information visit: https://www.kidney.org/covid-19

What if I have heart disease?

Heart Disease & COVID-19

  • The risk of heart disease related complications of a COVID-19 infection is lowered when your condition is well controlled
  • Be sure to take time for exercise and self-care (while following social distancing guidelines) to help maintain your heart health

 

CONTINUE TO TAKE ALL YOUR MEDICATIONS AS PRESCRIBED

  • Make sure to refill your medications on time – schedule your refill through the Yellowhawk Pharmacy by calling 541.240.8690
  • Call the Yellowhawk Pharmacy at 541.240.8691 to arrange for parking lot pick up or home delivery of medications
  • Have a list of all medications you take, the dosages, and how often you take them (you can ask the Yellowhawk Pharmacy staff to print a copy of this for you)

 

Follow dietary recommendations your healthcare provider has given you, even when planning emergency food supplies

  • If you want help thinking of meal ideas or planning what foods to have on hand, check out the link below for suggestions from the American Heart Association
  • They have other tips for staying healthy too, like ideas for staying active and relieving stress

 

For more information visit: https://www.heart.org/en/about-us/coronavirus-covid-19-resources

What if I have cancer?

Cancer & COVID-19

  • Cancer patients are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 infections, especially if you are currently undergoing chemotherapy or have had a bone marrow transplant
  • Before your doctor’s appointments, call your provider to see what special steps they are taking to protect high risk patients from COVID-19 infections

 

To protect your health:

  • Do not allow anyone who does not live in your home to visit in person – encourage your friends and family to call you on the phone or video chat with you instead
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • If you have to leave your home stay at least 6 feet away from other people at all times
  • If your doctor cancels a regular cancer screening appointment, reschedule it as soon as possible

 

CONTINUE TO TAKE ALL YOUR MEDICATIONS AS PRESCRIBED

  • Make sure to refill your medications on time – schedule your refill through the Yellowhawk Pharmacy by calling 541.240.8690
  • Call the Yellowhawk Pharmacy at 541.240.8691 to arrange for parking lot pick up or home delivery of medications
  • In case you would get sick, have a list of all medications you take, the dosages, and how often you take them (you can ask the Yellowhawk Pharmacy staff to print a copy of this for you)

 

For more information visit: https://www.cancer.org/about-us/what-we-do/coronavirus-covid-19-and-cancer.html

How do I talk with kids about COVID-19?

People everywhere are talking about coronavirus (COVID-19) on the news, social media, television commercials and more. Adults aren’t the only ones hearing about it, and just like adults, kids may be overwhelmed, stressed, and frightened about what they are hearing. Parents, family members, and other trusted adults can help them understand what they hear in a way that is honest, accurate, and reduces anxiety or fear.

 

Tips for talking with kids

 

Remain calm and reassuring. Kids hear not just what you say but how you say it. Use a calm voice and try not to seem worried.

 

Be available to listen and to talk. Schedule time each day to relax and connect with your children. Make sure they know they can come to you any time they have questions. Talk together about fears, worries and other feelings. Encourage them to call or video chat with friends and family to check on others and stay connected.

 

Pay attention to what they see or hear on television, radio, or online. Limit what they watch. Point them to age-appropriate content so they don’t end up finding news shows or outlets that scare them or have incorrect information. Talk together about what they are hearing and correct any false information.

 

Watch for changes in behavior. This may mean that they are anxious or not coping well. They may have trouble sleeping, complain of headaches or not feeling well, get cranky, be more clingy, or seem distracted. Keep reassuring them, talk to them about their feelings, and try to stick to your normal routines.

 

Provide facts. Give them honest, direct answers and facts that are appropriate for their age. Explain that some stories on the Internet and social media may be based on rumors and incorrect information.

 

Give them some control. Tell them what they can do to reduce the spread of germs and keep themselves and others safe.

  • Stay home and away from people who are sick.
  • Cough or sneeze into their elbow or a tissue, then throw the tissue into the trash.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after coughing or sneezing, going to the bathroom, and before eating or making food.

 

Be a good role model. When you show empathy and support to those who are sick, they will too. Pay attention to your own healthy habits, technology use and mental health. Show them that taking a break and protecting your own mental health is important. Let your kids know that it’s normal to feel worried and stressed out sometimes. Share with them how you deal with stress in a healthy way.

 

Getting the conversation started

 

Start by asking a child what they’ve already heard. Most children will have heard something, no matter their age.

 

Ask what questions they have. Keep the conversation direct and easy to understand. Answer their questions, but don’t offer more detail than they are interested in.

 

Follow your child’s lead. Some kids may want to ask lots of questions and talk every day about COVID-19. Others may not be interested in talking about it much at all. Both are ok.

 

It’s ok to say “I don’t know.” If your child asks about something and you don’t know the answer, find the answer together. Check CDC.gov/coronavirus for up-to-date, reliable information.

 

Keep checking in. Talk about current events and what they are hearing about, their questions, and their feelings. Help them think through stories they hear about. Ask questions like: What do you think about this story? Why do you think this happened?

 

Keep explanations age-appropriate. Balance simple, direct facts with reassurances that they are safe and will be taken care of, especially for younger children.

Older children may need more discussions and information. Help them identify facts from rumors.